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The summers in Missouri can be brutal for both indoor and outdoor workers with those in the construction industry put at the highest risk. The following are just five safety hazards that construction workers face in the summer and what their employers can do about them.

Heat-related fatigue, the first one, can impair workers both physically and mentally. It can be averted with hydrating fluids and frequent breaks in a shady area. Second, there is the danger of heat-related illness. Workers should be trained on how to identify its symptoms. If possible, employers can have employees work in the early morning or late in the evening when it is cooler. Canopies and umbrellas on the job site can come in handy.

Dehydration is the third leading hazard, and if workers don’t want to drink water, employers may want to put out electrolytic beverages. The fourth risk has to do with prolonged sun exposure. Hats and sunscreen are essential. Those with fair skin should be regularly checked for abnormal spots and moles.

Lastly, workers are at a high risk for injury or death in roadside construction zones. Supervisors must have barriers out to identify the zone and post a reduced speed limit sign. On-site safety training is important, as is the use of safety vests.

On-the-job injuries and illnesses can form the basis for a workers’ compensation claim, but victims may want to see a lawyer before preparing one. While they do not have to prove that anyone was negligent in order to be eligible for benefits, they may still face opposition from the employer. If the claim is disputed or denied, having legal assistance at an appeals hearing can be advisable.