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Workers' Compensation Archives

What employers can do to meet OSHA standards

Workers are entitled to a safe workplace that is free from known hazards. To that end, OSHA is making it a point to ensure that those who work on or near electrical components do not get hurt or killed at work. Between October 2012 and September 2018, six electrical installation professionals were killed in Missouri, Kansas and Nebraska. A representative from OSHA who works in Missouri says that employers can keep their workers safe by providing them with adequate training and other resources.

Summer heat poses a danger to workers

Workers in Missouri may face a particular threat to health and safety in the summer months. The summer of 2018 marked the fourth hottest on record, and many people fear that the increased temperatures are here to stay. Both indoor and outdoor workers can be affected by excessive heat even though people working outside may be more prone to the immediate effects of the temperature. Other aspects of the job may combine with the ambient temperature to escalate the risks of excessive heat, including warm mandatory personal protective gear or hot-running machinery and equipment.

Gig economy, other factors lead to rise in construction deaths

According to the investment management firm Conning, nearly half of 2017's workplace fatalities occurred in two industries: construction and transportation. Construction workers in Missouri should note that this trend is being caused by a number of factors, including a lack of healthy workers and a shortage of experienced workers.

Electrical rules can help prevent dangerous accidents

Electrical workers in Missouri can face serious dangers on the job. Mistakes with electricity, after all, can be catastrophic and even life-threatening. There are a number of regulations in place that aim to make the workplace safer for employees, especially those dealing with inherently hazardous materials like live electricity. Many of these regulations are implemented federally by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the agency charged with implementing and enforcing rules to protect workplace safety. However, OSHA also generally seeks to expand partnerships with private industry in developing regulations.

Trench excavation deaths go up in 2016 and 2017

The Bureau of Labor Statistics recorded 23 excavation and trench-related deaths across the U.S. in 2016; this is double the average of the previous five years. The year 2017 saw 17 deaths, but when combined with the number of injury reports made to OSHA, it was by far the most dangerous year to date for trench workers. Missouri residents who work in the excavation industry should know what factors into this rise.

The challenges facing retail workers over the holidays

With the holiday shopping season come additional work hours and extra pay for retail workers in Missouri. While workers may benefit financially on the one hand, they could suffer from loss of sleep and lost family time on the other. In 2016, 24 percent of U.S. employees said that work interfered with personal and family obligations. This is just one of a few challenges pointed out by OSHA and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

NIOSH warns against diesel exhaust exposure

Exposure to the diesel particulate matter found in diesel exhaust is a frequent hazard in workplaces across Missouri and the rest of the U.S. Diesel is used in trucks, earth-moving equipment, compressors and generators, to name a few examples; exposure to high concentrations of DPM, when short-term, leads to headaches, dizziness and severe irritation of the throat, nose and eyes.

OSHA recommends safe practices for tree care workers

The Washington State Department of Labor and Industries has stated that though landscape workers make up less than 1 percent of the nation's workforce, they compose 3.5 percent of workplace fatalities. Among those fatalities, 75 percent are related to tree removal or trimming. The three leading causes are falls, struck-by incidents and electrical accidents. Tree care workers in Missouri should know, however, that OSHA has provided safety recommendations.

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